April 1, 2016 · Comments Off on Encryption comes to Juiced.GS

APRIL 1, 2016 — LEOMINSTER, MA — In a rare show of support for modern-day Apple Inc., Juiced.GS has come out on the side of encryption in the ongoing battle between the former manufacturer of the Apple II and the FBI.

FBI vs. Juiced.GS

It's on.

"It is every developer's and every publisher's right to communicate with their customers without the government eavesdropping," said magazine editor Ken Gagne. "That goes for Juiced.GS as well. But with a number of Juiced.GS issues addressed to Australia being inexplicably delayed or intercepted, we can only assume agents within the USPS are funneling our magazines to the FBI for analysis. This is a gross breach of our customers' confidentiality: our hacker interviews, programming tutorials, and game reviews are for subscribers' eyes only."

Juiced.GS V21I1 (Encrypted)To defeat this latest threat to our intrinsic freedom and national security, all issues of Juiced.GS will now come with AES 128-bit encryption. The encoded text can be typed into an Apple II running The Byte Works' Crypto software, available from the Juiced.GS store, resulting in a seamless, integrated reading experience. An accelerator card is recommended to allow each issue to be decrypted before the next quarter's Juiced.GS arrives. Other compatible hardware includes the Quickie handheld scanner for faster input and the CFFA3000 for optional two-factor authentication via a USB dongle.

Juiced.GS readers have long requested a digital edition of the magazine, so to produce this new format, the longest-running Apple II print publication is taking a cue from a successful predecessor. "We're big fans of Nibble and know our readers will appreciate this return to typing in programs from magazine—except this time, the program is the magazine," said Gagne. Supporting this new initiative, Juiced.GS will begin publishing 'one-liner' articles, starting with movie reviews by Eric 'Sheppy' Shepherd.

"Although we traditionally are a politically neutral publication, we felt this stance was an important one to take," affirmed Gagne. "And a safe one: we bet not even the All Writs Act of 1789 will know what to do with an Apple II."

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